Do I Need Workers' Compensation for my Caregiver?

Workers’ compensation is a type of insurance that covers workers who suffer a work-related illness or injury.

How would it work with your caregiver?  Let’s say he or she twists her ankle while on the job and unfortunately has to miss a work week.  If the caregiver is covered by workers' compensation insurance, then he or she will have her lost wages as well as medical bills covered for the period missed.

Workers' Compensation laws vary by state. Have a look below to see what the requirements are in yours.

Arizona

Arizona, unlike certain other states, does not mandate workers’ compensation coverage for caregivers. That means employers are not required to buy a worker’s comp policy covering their caregiver.
Employers may, however, voluntarily buy coverage. 

California

Yes, you will need to get workers’ compensation insurance for your caregiver.
In California, anyone who employs one or more full-time or part-time employees must have workers’ comp insurance. In almost all cases, a caregiver is considered to be an employee (as opposed to an independent contractor) because of the amount of control the employer has over how the caregiver performs the work.
Fortunately, securing workers’ comp insurance for your caregiver should be relatively easy. In most cases, it's already included within your homeowner's insurance policy. If not, you can add workers’ comp insurance to your homeowner’s insurance policy (or possibly renter’s insurance if you don’t own a home) for a minimal fee. Check with your current insurance provider to see if you have the option of adding workers’ comp to your homeowner's policy. If not, you can still purchase coverage through a workers' compensation insurance company such as Cluett Insurance.

Connecticut 

Household employers in Connecticut are required to carry a workers' compensation insurance policy if their employee works 26 hours per week on a regular basis.
To satisfy the obligation to compensate the employee with statutory benefits should an injury occur, a standard workers' compensation policy will need to be purchased unless the homeowners' policy is specifically endorsed to provide this coverage (which is very unusual).
Some homeowners decide that they want to voluntarily protect employees who work 26 or fewer hours per week with benefits available under the Workers' Compensation Law. Again, this is possible with the purchase of a standard workers' compensation policy.

Florida

Florida, unlike certain other states, does not mandate workers’ compensation coverage for caregivers. That means employers are not required to buy a worker’s comp policy covering their caregiver. 
Employers may, however, voluntarily buy coverage. 

Nevada

Nevada, unlike certain other states, does not mandate workers’ compensation coverage for caregivers. That means employers are not required to buy a worker’s comp policy covering their caregiver.

Employers may, however, voluntarily buy coverage. 

New Jersey

Yes, you will need to get workers’ compensation insurance for your caregiver.
In New Jersey, anyone who employs one or more full-time or part-time employees must have workers’ comp insurance. In almost all cases, a caregiver is considered to be an employee (as opposed to an independent contractor) because of the amount of control the employer has over how the caregiver performs the work.

Fortunately, securing workers’ comp insurance for your caregiver should be relatively easy. Check with your current insurance provider to see if you have the option of adding workers’ comp to your homeowner's policy. If not, you can still purchase coverage through a workers' compensation insurance company such as Cluett Insurance.

New York

Household employers in New York are required to carry a workers' compensation insurance policy if their employee works 40 or more hours per week. 
As part of Kindly Care's Onboarding process, we can guide you to a convenient, affordable solution.

Texas

Texas, unlike certain other states, does not mandate workers’ compensation coverage for caregivers. That means employers are not required to buy a worker’s comp policy covering their caregiver.
Employers may, however, voluntarily buy coverage. 
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